Sunday, November 21, 2010

December Reading Thursday the 2nd--Three Years!

Oh, man, will this ever be good!

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: 1,000 WORDS READING: PERMANENCE
7PM sharp-9PM, Thursday, December 2 AT THE WAYPOST, 3120 N. WILLIAMS AVE., PORTLAND (503-367-3182)
FREE
ALL-AGES VENUE; FOOD, BEER, AND WINE AVAILABLE
CONTACT: MEL FAVARA, 971-506-3340, mel.favara@gmail.com

We’ll present the newest chapter in a Oulipean experiment, and our 3RD ANNIVERSARY SHOW (mysterious and random door prizes provided)! Five exemplary local writers, one musician, and a filmmaker responded to the theme PERMANENCE, penning 250 words per week (or making 250 seconds of film) for four weeks, totaling 1,000 words each, in response to the theme and prompts created/found/stolen by series curator Mel Favara. The results, as per usual, have been wildly divergent, smart, and fresh: want to see how six participants employed the phrase, “tattooed the word "tiny" across her knuckles” and the words tattered,
sale, spin, pool, and foil in one 250 word piece? Join us Thursday the 2nd at the Waypost to hear the writer’s innovative writing and also witness the 1,000 Words house band, Reid Trevarthen, playing songs based on the prompts at the intermission.

Performers:
Joe Pitkin can make few claims to specialness besides the fact that he is a perennial reader for 1,000 Words: he’s kind of like the Randy Newman of 1,000 Words. His poetry has appeared in North American Review, Beloit Poetry Journal, Los Angeles Review, and elsewhere; he started writing speculative fiction a couple of years ago and has had pieces in M-Brane and Expanded Horizons. He teaches—if you can call what he does teaching—at Clark College.

Kevin Sampsell is the publisher of the micropress, Future Tense Books, and a writer whose work has appeared widely in places like Nerve, Night Train, Opium, McSweeney's, Quick Fiction, Yeti, and Smith Magazine. He is the editor of Portland Noir and the author of Creamy Bullets and A Common Pornography.

Laura Moulton earned an MFA from Eastern Washington University. She has taught writing workshops in high schools, universities, and the women’s prison in Wilsonville. Her art piece “Object Permanence” was commissioned by Portland State University in 2009. Her stories and essays have been featured in Hip Mama, Portland Tribune, and Brain, Child. Her essay about visiting slums in Brazil appeared in Street Roots in June. She is a contributing artist to Disappearing, a book project by artist Melody Owen. Moulton is currently at work on a novel.

Amy Temple Harper is adopted from Korea and lives in Portland. Her poetry and
fiction have been published in the Oregon Literary Review and The Portland Review.

Kirby Light is a peripheral visionary! He can see way into the future but only off to the left and right. He is a firm believer that punctuation is not sexy and that the state of a man's kitchen is no indication of how well that man can take care of a woman. When not being the hero and villain of his own story you can find Kirby laying in the gutter looking up at the stars, or you can find him writing, but the writing is just the residue and far from what he does best.

Musician Reid Trevarthen lived in Italy at one point in time. At other points in time he played “Weather Watchers” with his grade school friends, learned how to speak some German and alternated between wearing and not wearing glasses. Now he is playing music and starting to learn to do the things that grown-ups do.

Karl Lind is a filmmaker, cameraman, director, editor, and video artist living in Portland, Oregon. He has been contemplating adopting a cat for quite awhile. See his work at www.inthecanllc.com.

Curator/Host Mel Favara has helmed 1,000 Words for three years, wrote the zine teen sleuth through the 90’s and 00s, teaches writing and literature at Clark College, and makes a mean marinara from scratch.

Tuesday, September 14, 2010

October Reading Press Release!

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: 1,000 WORDS READING: FLIGHT
7PM sharp-9PM, Thursday, OCTOBER 7 AT THE WAYPOST, 3120 N. WILLIAMS AVE., PORTLAND (503-367-3182)
FREE
ALL-AGES VENUE; FOOD, BEER, AND WINE AVAILABLE
CONTACT: MEL FAVARA, 971-506-3340, mel.favara@gmail.com

We’ll present the newest chapter in a Oulipean experiment: four exemplary local writers, one musician, and a filmmaker responded to the theme FLIGHT, penning 250 words per week (or making 250 seconds of film) for four weeks in response to the theme and prompts created/found/stolen by series curator Mel Favara. The results, as per usual, have been wildly divergent, smart, and fresh: want to see how six participants employed the phrase, “In the course of that particular malady” and the words “savor, sooty, artifice, administer, and wheels” in one 250 word piece? Join us Thursday at the Waypost to hear the writer’s innovative writing and also witness the 1,000 Words house band, Reid Trevarthen, playing songs based on the prompts at the intermission.

Dan Kaplan is the author of Bill's Formal Complaint (The National Poetry Review Press, 2008) and the bilingual chapbook SKIN (Red Hydra Press, 2005). His work has appeared in many publications, including Denver Quarterly, Barrow Street, diode, Meridian, Quarterly West, Indiana Review, Verse Daily, and the anthology Flash Fiction Forward (W.W. Norton & Co.). His website is www.dan-kaplan.com.

Lucie Bonvalet teaches French at the Alliance Fran├žaise, writes for the French art and culture zine Globulot, and studies dance, Japanese and tai chi.

Wendy Noonan’s poems have been published in Permafrost, Diner, Bolts of Silk, Prick of the Spindle, and Painted Bride. She was the 2008 recipient of the Shelley Reece award for poetry, and has a permanent gig with the Noonan family Christmas letter.

Sara Kolp writes bold fiction and nonfiction, parents fantastically, raises chickens, and generally jazzes up North Portland.

Musician Reid Trevarthen lived in Italy at one point in time. At other points in time he played “Weather Watchers” with his grade school friends, learned how to speak some German and alternated between wearing and not wearing glasses. Now he is playing music and starting to learn to do the things that grown-ups do.

Karl Lind is a filmmaker, cameraman, director, editor, and video artist living in Portland, Oregon. He has been contemplating adopting a cat for quite awhile. See his work at www.inthecanllc.com.

Curator/Host Mel Favara has helmed 1,000 Words for nearly three years, wrote the zine teen sleuth through the 90’s and 00s, teaches writing and literature at Clark College, and makes a mean marinara from scratch.

Hooray! October Reading!

We are excited to announce the October reading--which leads up to our 3rd anniversary reading in December!

On October 7 a great Brain Trust of readers and one filmmaker will respond to prompts on the theme FLIGHT.

They will be Lucie Bonvalet, Wendy Noonan, Sara Kolp, Dan Kaplan, and Karl Lind. Look for details soon.

We love our new venue at the Waypost!

XO,
Mel

Tuesday, August 10, 2010

Oh, boy!

The first Waypost reading was so lovely! The next will be the same. Thanks to the great crowd who welcomed us to our new venue! 1K Words goes forth. Thanks for coming along.

Wednesday, July 28, 2010

1,000 Words Returns August 5 at the Waypost

1,000 WORDS READING MOVES TO THE WAYPOST FOR ITS NEXT INSTALLMENT: EXCESS
7 p.m. sharp-9 p.m., THURSDAY, August 5 at THE WAYPOST, 3120 N. Williams Avenue – Portland, (503) 367- 3182
FREE, ALL-AGES VENUE
CONTACT: MEL FAVARA, 971-506-3340, mel.favara@gmail.com
1,000 Words returns Thursday, August 5 for our inaugural reading at the Waypost. We’ll present the newest chapter in a Oulipean experiment: five exemplary local writers wrote on the theme EXCESS, penning 250 words per week in response to prompts created/found/stolen by series curator Mel Favara. The results, as per usual, have been wildly divergent, smart, and fresh: want to see how five different authors employed the phrase, “It looked like an exit wound” and the words “frame, nail, prognosticate, key, and typeface” in one 250 word piece? Join us Thursday at the Waypost to hear the writer’s innovative work and also witness the 1,000 Words house band, Reid Trevarthen and Ethan Camp, members of Vancouver emo-punk trio We Play Quiet, playing songs based on the prompts at the intermission.

Nora Robertson writes fiction, poetry, and nonfiction, which have appeared in such publications as Plazm, Redactions, Alimentum, Monkeybicycle, and Portland Monthly, and was nominated for the 2007 Pushcart Prize. She is the producer of the New Oregon Interview Series, which explores Portland’s evolving creative culture. She is currently at work with video artist Jason Bahling on a short poetic film The Body Show to be released in November.

Joe Pitkin teaches English at Clark College (or, depending on his mood, Cluck Collage or Cork Cleavage). His work has appeared, or is forthcoming, in North American Review, Beloit Poetry Journal, and Los Angeles Review. The novel he is working on currently has the tentative title The Four Quakers of the Apocalypse, but that will probably change.

Cosimo Giovine teaches writing classes at Clark College in Vancouver, WA. His story, “Dream Book” was a Finalist in the 2008 Glimmer Train Very Short Fiction contest, and the graphic novel he edited, Vatican City, Las Vegas, received the bronze award at the 2007 Independent Publisher Magazine Awards. He’s a Leo and enjoys words that begin with the letters “r” and “s”.

Becky Kluth is a sometimes story writer, music maker and portrait painter living in Southeast Portland. Her hobbies include acquiring cheap instruments, organizing her possessions, and trying to become a real person. She spends most of her time talking to dogs.

Nick Carter is a former professional paintball player and Texas high school football defensive tackle who moved to Portland hoping to realize his creative dreams. He is currently unemployed.

Reid Trevarthen and Ethan Camp are both polymaths: they’ll be playing songs based on the writers’ prompts.

Monday, July 26, 2010

We Live!

And we are moving to first Thursdays, for now, and to the Waypost. And we have GREAT readers! See below!


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: 1,000 WORDS READING MOVES TO THE WAYPOST FOR ITS NEXT INSTALLMENT: EXCESS
7 p.m. sharp-9 p.m., THURSDAY, August 5 at THE WAYPOST, 3120 N. Williams Avenue – Portland, (503) 367- 3182
FREE, ALL-AGES VENUE
CONTACT: MEL FAVARA, 971-506-3340, mel.favara@gmail.com
1,000 Words returns Thursday, August 5 for our inaugural reading at the Waypost. We’ll present the newest chapter in a Oulipean experiment: five exemplary local writers wrote on the theme EXCESS, penning 250 words per week in response to prompts created/found/stolen by series curator Mel Favara. The results, as per usual, have been wildly divergent, smart, and fresh: want to see how five different authors employed the phrase, “It looked like an exit wound” and the words “frame, nail, prognosticate, key, and typeface” in one 250 word piece? Join us Thursday at the Waypost to hear the writer’s innovative writing and also witness the 1,000 Words house band, Reid Trevarthen and Ethan Camp, members of Vancouver emo-punk trio We Play Quiet playing songs based on the prompts at the intermission.

Nora Robertson writes fiction, poetry, and nonfiction, which have appeared in such publications as Plazm, Redactions, Alimentum, Monkeybicycle, and Portland Monthly, and was nominated for the 2007 Pushcart Prize. She is the producer of the New Oregon Interview Series, which explores Portland’s evolving creative culture. She is currently at work with video artist Jason Bahling on a short poetic film The Body Show to be released in November.

Joe Pitkin teaches English at Clark College (or, depending on his mood, Cluck Collage or Cork Cleavage). His work has appeared, or is forthcoming, in North American Review, Beloit Poetry Journal, and Los Angeles Review. The novel he is working on currently has the tentative title The Four Quakers of the Apocalypse, but that will probably change.

Cosimo Giovine teaches writing classes at Clark College in Vancouver, WA. His story, “Dream Book” was a Finalist in the 2008 Glimmer Train Very Short Fiction contest, and the graphic novel he edited, Vatican City, Las Vegas, received the bronze award at the 2007 Independent Publisher Magazine Awards. He’s a Leo and enjoys words that begin with the letters “r” and “s”.

Becky Kluth is a sometimes story writer, music maker and portrait painter living in Southeast Portland. Her hobbies include acquiring cheap instruments, organizing her possessions, and trying to become a real person. She spends most of her time talking to dogs.

Nick Carter is a former professional paintball player and Texas high school football defensive tackle who moved to Portland hoping to realize his creative dreams. He is currently unemployed.

Reid Trevarthen and Ethan Camp are both polymaths: they’ll be playing songs based on the writers’ prompts.

Tuesday, April 27, 2010

1,000 Words "Quitting" Monday, May 3

1,000 Words convenes once again for another Monday night of literary revelry. As per usual, four writers agreed to write 250 words per week for the month leading up to the reading, this time on the theme "Quitting". The writers also agreed, wisely or not, to include a handful of challenging prompts in each week's effort. The results are, well, pretty fascinating. Join us Monday, May 3 at 7 pm at the Maiden (the corner of SE Morrison and 7th) for a free all ages show that may leave your socks intact, but will blow your mind. Here's a sample prompt and a who's who of the excellent readers. Reid Trevarthen and Ethan Camp will favor us with a short set of songs based on the prompts during intermission.

Prompt 1
Phrase:
the thing that changed everything, but failed

Words:
brink
bank
wheel
tar
and plume.

Readers:

B. Frayn Masters is co-host and co-producer of Back Fence PDX Productions. Samplers of her writing can be found in MonkeyBicycle 6, Hobart, Spork, and Mountain Man Dance Moves: The McSweeney’s Book of Lists. Masters is one half of the funny and brainy sketch comedy duo Eastland Academy, and is a member of rapid-fire performance group Haiku Inferno. She is a freelance scriptwriter, copywriter, and director.

Lisa Hoashi is a writer and humanitarian who lives and works in Portland, Oregon. Her writing has appeared in Willamette Week and The Missouri Review, among other publications. Short stories are her current focus, as well as the various types of writing she does in her position at Mercy Corps, which is sending her to Haiti this year to tell the stories of earthquake survivors.

Spencer Newlin-Cushing is an Editor and Marketing partner for the readinglocal.com website as well as a Marketing Coordinator for Wordstock Book Festival. He loves to nest parenthesis. His stories can’t be found anywhere yet, but he hopes to change that soon.

Jeff Schmitt wrote a book and then sat on it, which was probably for
the best. He lives in a knowable world, makes the bed sometimes and
doesn’t speak a word of French.

Thursday, March 18, 2010

Away Too Long

As Laura Moulton's narrator might say in her upcoming novel, "Oh my heck!"

Despite the lag here, 1000 Words has been rocking forward into the new decade with readings themed "Lies" and "Resolve" and others. And we have another reading coming up the first Monday in May, themed "Quitting," and starring the great Frayn Masters. Stay tuned for details.

In the interim, I've been teaching like crazy, and I just MC-ed the terrific Read to Rebuild Haiti benefit hosted by Portland Reading Local and the Writer's Dojo at their beautiful space in St. Johns. We raised over $1,000 for Mercy Corps, and Tom Spanbauer, Ariel Gore, Kevin Sampsell, Margaret Malone, Ben Parzybok, and Laura Moulton all read incredible work, which the friendly crowd appreciated.

In other news, after an absence, our house band, We Play Quiet, has returned--frontman Ethan Camp decided that Hampshire College was "the place rich people with no vision dump their weird kids," and came back west to study English at Western Washington University. Atta boy, Ethan.

We're still shopping for one more reader for May--hit me up if you know a genius.
Love,
Mel