Saturday, March 12, 2011

Stop the Press! Guest Curator for April's Reading!

The subject line has most of it. I am hanging up my spurs for the month and welcoming the smart stylings of Joe Pitkin, 6-time 1K reader, who chose the theme for the April 7 reading and is writing the prompts. I will be a reader this time, and I'm both grateful for the break and excited about the new life I know Joe will breathe into the series. Join us at 7 p.m. Thursday, April 7 at the Waypost for the newewst installment--I, Geneva Chao, Kerrie Cohen, and Gordon Buffonge will be among the readers--there is also a filmmaker making, well, film, for the reading, and Reid Trevarthen will be writing songs based on the prompts as well. Hooray! And while I didn't INTEND to write Sherlock Holmes/John Watson slash fiction for my contribution, well...

Thursday, February 3, 2011

February 1,000 Words!

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: 1,000 WORDS READING At THE WAYPOST: NEXT INSTALLMENT: “LUCK”
7 p.m. sharp-9 p.m., THURSDAY, February 3 at THE WAYPOST, 3120 N. Williams Avenue – Portland, (503) 367- 3182
FREE, ALL-AGES VENUE
CONTACT: MEL FAVARA, 971-506-3340, mel.favara@gmail.com
1,000 Words returns Thursday, February 3 at the Waypost. We’ll present the newest chapter in a Oulipean experiment: four fresh local writers wrote on the theme LUCK, penning 250 words per week in response to prompts created/found/stolen by series curator Mel Favara. The results of this living literary laboratory, as per usual, have been wildly divergent, smart, and fresh: want to see how four different authors employed the phrase, “I should have been dead either way” and the words “slam, shrink, shrine, flight, and cradle” in one 250 word piece? Join us Thursday February 3 at the Waypost to hear the writer’s innovative responses and also witness the 1,000 Words house troubador, Reid Trevarthen, member of Vancouver emo-punk trio We Play Quiet, playing songs based on the prompts at the intermission.

Readers
Mike Peroni was born to a solid blue collar family, graduated from an elitist private school for boys, dropped out of college and traveled the continent with a copy of Desolation Angels in his hip pocket. He now owns and operates Boistfort Valley Farm in Curtis WA with his wife Heidi and their three-year-old daughter Natalina. Mike is a self-professed farmer, fisherman, and motorcycle enthusiast; not necessarily in that order.

Christopher Luna is an expatriate New Yorker and the host of a popular open mic poetry reading in Vancouver, WA, est. 2004. Since landing in Vancouver in 2003, Christopher has documented his observations of the city in his Ghost Town poems, which were collected
in a 2008 chapbook. He is also the editor of "The Work," a monthly newsletter devoted to informing people about poetry events in Portland and Vancouver.

Daneen Bergland's poetry has appeared in several literary journals including The Burnside Review, Verse Daily, and Propeller Quarterly magazine, with work forthcoming in Cerise Press and Poet Lore. In 2008 she received a fellowship from Oregon Literary Arts. She teaches online classes about popular culture to sophomores at Portland State University, which means she feels almost no guilt for revisiting the entire Joss Whedon ouvre on Netflix this year and checking her Facebook page several times a day. As an antidote to all that intellectual stimulation, and sitting, her hobbies include taking Zumba classes and eating vegetables.

Ryan Davis is honored to be a part of 1,000 Words again.
Horoscope: Scorpio
Jobs: Teaching lit and comp at Clackamas Community College, Co-Directing Portland World Theatre
Blood Type: O-
Charm Points: His wife, Angie, and son, Avery, who are his reasons for creating anything
Favorite Meal: Breakfast
Hobby: Sleeping

Musician Reid Trevarthen is totally weirded out by the existence of matter, photoptropism, and the scale of the very large and the very small. He'd love to discuss them enthusiastically with you.

Host Mel Favara has curated 1,000 Words for three years, teaches writing and literature at Clark College, and has terrific

Sunday, November 21, 2010

December Reading Thursday the 2nd--Three Years!

Oh, man, will this ever be good!

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: 1,000 WORDS READING: PERMANENCE
7PM sharp-9PM, Thursday, December 2 AT THE WAYPOST, 3120 N. WILLIAMS AVE., PORTLAND (503-367-3182)
FREE
ALL-AGES VENUE; FOOD, BEER, AND WINE AVAILABLE
CONTACT: MEL FAVARA, 971-506-3340, mel.favara@gmail.com

We’ll present the newest chapter in a Oulipean experiment, and our 3RD ANNIVERSARY SHOW (mysterious and random door prizes provided)! Five exemplary local writers, one musician, and a filmmaker responded to the theme PERMANENCE, penning 250 words per week (or making 250 seconds of film) for four weeks, totaling 1,000 words each, in response to the theme and prompts created/found/stolen by series curator Mel Favara. The results, as per usual, have been wildly divergent, smart, and fresh: want to see how six participants employed the phrase, “tattooed the word "tiny" across her knuckles” and the words tattered,
sale, spin, pool, and foil in one 250 word piece? Join us Thursday the 2nd at the Waypost to hear the writer’s innovative writing and also witness the 1,000 Words house band, Reid Trevarthen, playing songs based on the prompts at the intermission.

Performers:
Joe Pitkin can make few claims to specialness besides the fact that he is a perennial reader for 1,000 Words: he’s kind of like the Randy Newman of 1,000 Words. His poetry has appeared in North American Review, Beloit Poetry Journal, Los Angeles Review, and elsewhere; he started writing speculative fiction a couple of years ago and has had pieces in M-Brane and Expanded Horizons. He teaches—if you can call what he does teaching—at Clark College.

Kevin Sampsell is the publisher of the micropress, Future Tense Books, and a writer whose work has appeared widely in places like Nerve, Night Train, Opium, McSweeney's, Quick Fiction, Yeti, and Smith Magazine. He is the editor of Portland Noir and the author of Creamy Bullets and A Common Pornography.

Laura Moulton earned an MFA from Eastern Washington University. She has taught writing workshops in high schools, universities, and the women’s prison in Wilsonville. Her art piece “Object Permanence” was commissioned by Portland State University in 2009. Her stories and essays have been featured in Hip Mama, Portland Tribune, and Brain, Child. Her essay about visiting slums in Brazil appeared in Street Roots in June. She is a contributing artist to Disappearing, a book project by artist Melody Owen. Moulton is currently at work on a novel.

Amy Temple Harper is adopted from Korea and lives in Portland. Her poetry and
fiction have been published in the Oregon Literary Review and The Portland Review.

Kirby Light is a peripheral visionary! He can see way into the future but only off to the left and right. He is a firm believer that punctuation is not sexy and that the state of a man's kitchen is no indication of how well that man can take care of a woman. When not being the hero and villain of his own story you can find Kirby laying in the gutter looking up at the stars, or you can find him writing, but the writing is just the residue and far from what he does best.

Musician Reid Trevarthen lived in Italy at one point in time. At other points in time he played “Weather Watchers” with his grade school friends, learned how to speak some German and alternated between wearing and not wearing glasses. Now he is playing music and starting to learn to do the things that grown-ups do.

Karl Lind is a filmmaker, cameraman, director, editor, and video artist living in Portland, Oregon. He has been contemplating adopting a cat for quite awhile. See his work at www.inthecanllc.com.

Curator/Host Mel Favara has helmed 1,000 Words for three years, wrote the zine teen sleuth through the 90’s and 00s, teaches writing and literature at Clark College, and makes a mean marinara from scratch.

Tuesday, September 14, 2010

October Reading Press Release!

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: 1,000 WORDS READING: FLIGHT
7PM sharp-9PM, Thursday, OCTOBER 7 AT THE WAYPOST, 3120 N. WILLIAMS AVE., PORTLAND (503-367-3182)
FREE
ALL-AGES VENUE; FOOD, BEER, AND WINE AVAILABLE
CONTACT: MEL FAVARA, 971-506-3340, mel.favara@gmail.com

We’ll present the newest chapter in a Oulipean experiment: four exemplary local writers, one musician, and a filmmaker responded to the theme FLIGHT, penning 250 words per week (or making 250 seconds of film) for four weeks in response to the theme and prompts created/found/stolen by series curator Mel Favara. The results, as per usual, have been wildly divergent, smart, and fresh: want to see how six participants employed the phrase, “In the course of that particular malady” and the words “savor, sooty, artifice, administer, and wheels” in one 250 word piece? Join us Thursday at the Waypost to hear the writer’s innovative writing and also witness the 1,000 Words house band, Reid Trevarthen, playing songs based on the prompts at the intermission.

Dan Kaplan is the author of Bill's Formal Complaint (The National Poetry Review Press, 2008) and the bilingual chapbook SKIN (Red Hydra Press, 2005). His work has appeared in many publications, including Denver Quarterly, Barrow Street, diode, Meridian, Quarterly West, Indiana Review, Verse Daily, and the anthology Flash Fiction Forward (W.W. Norton & Co.). His website is www.dan-kaplan.com.

Lucie Bonvalet teaches French at the Alliance Fran├žaise, writes for the French art and culture zine Globulot, and studies dance, Japanese and tai chi.

Wendy Noonan’s poems have been published in Permafrost, Diner, Bolts of Silk, Prick of the Spindle, and Painted Bride. She was the 2008 recipient of the Shelley Reece award for poetry, and has a permanent gig with the Noonan family Christmas letter.

Sara Kolp writes bold fiction and nonfiction, parents fantastically, raises chickens, and generally jazzes up North Portland.

Musician Reid Trevarthen lived in Italy at one point in time. At other points in time he played “Weather Watchers” with his grade school friends, learned how to speak some German and alternated between wearing and not wearing glasses. Now he is playing music and starting to learn to do the things that grown-ups do.

Karl Lind is a filmmaker, cameraman, director, editor, and video artist living in Portland, Oregon. He has been contemplating adopting a cat for quite awhile. See his work at www.inthecanllc.com.

Curator/Host Mel Favara has helmed 1,000 Words for nearly three years, wrote the zine teen sleuth through the 90’s and 00s, teaches writing and literature at Clark College, and makes a mean marinara from scratch.

Hooray! October Reading!

We are excited to announce the October reading--which leads up to our 3rd anniversary reading in December!

On October 7 a great Brain Trust of readers and one filmmaker will respond to prompts on the theme FLIGHT.

They will be Lucie Bonvalet, Wendy Noonan, Sara Kolp, Dan Kaplan, and Karl Lind. Look for details soon.

We love our new venue at the Waypost!

XO,
Mel

Tuesday, August 10, 2010

Oh, boy!

The first Waypost reading was so lovely! The next will be the same. Thanks to the great crowd who welcomed us to our new venue! 1K Words goes forth. Thanks for coming along.

Wednesday, July 28, 2010

1,000 Words Returns August 5 at the Waypost

1,000 WORDS READING MOVES TO THE WAYPOST FOR ITS NEXT INSTALLMENT: EXCESS
7 p.m. sharp-9 p.m., THURSDAY, August 5 at THE WAYPOST, 3120 N. Williams Avenue – Portland, (503) 367- 3182
FREE, ALL-AGES VENUE
CONTACT: MEL FAVARA, 971-506-3340, mel.favara@gmail.com
1,000 Words returns Thursday, August 5 for our inaugural reading at the Waypost. We’ll present the newest chapter in a Oulipean experiment: five exemplary local writers wrote on the theme EXCESS, penning 250 words per week in response to prompts created/found/stolen by series curator Mel Favara. The results, as per usual, have been wildly divergent, smart, and fresh: want to see how five different authors employed the phrase, “It looked like an exit wound” and the words “frame, nail, prognosticate, key, and typeface” in one 250 word piece? Join us Thursday at the Waypost to hear the writer’s innovative work and also witness the 1,000 Words house band, Reid Trevarthen and Ethan Camp, members of Vancouver emo-punk trio We Play Quiet, playing songs based on the prompts at the intermission.

Nora Robertson writes fiction, poetry, and nonfiction, which have appeared in such publications as Plazm, Redactions, Alimentum, Monkeybicycle, and Portland Monthly, and was nominated for the 2007 Pushcart Prize. She is the producer of the New Oregon Interview Series, which explores Portland’s evolving creative culture. She is currently at work with video artist Jason Bahling on a short poetic film The Body Show to be released in November.

Joe Pitkin teaches English at Clark College (or, depending on his mood, Cluck Collage or Cork Cleavage). His work has appeared, or is forthcoming, in North American Review, Beloit Poetry Journal, and Los Angeles Review. The novel he is working on currently has the tentative title The Four Quakers of the Apocalypse, but that will probably change.

Cosimo Giovine teaches writing classes at Clark College in Vancouver, WA. His story, “Dream Book” was a Finalist in the 2008 Glimmer Train Very Short Fiction contest, and the graphic novel he edited, Vatican City, Las Vegas, received the bronze award at the 2007 Independent Publisher Magazine Awards. He’s a Leo and enjoys words that begin with the letters “r” and “s”.

Becky Kluth is a sometimes story writer, music maker and portrait painter living in Southeast Portland. Her hobbies include acquiring cheap instruments, organizing her possessions, and trying to become a real person. She spends most of her time talking to dogs.

Nick Carter is a former professional paintball player and Texas high school football defensive tackle who moved to Portland hoping to realize his creative dreams. He is currently unemployed.

Reid Trevarthen and Ethan Camp are both polymaths: they’ll be playing songs based on the writers’ prompts.